Fri, 03/06/2020 - 10:30

Because we are talking a lot about wellbeing and emotional safety these days I have been thinking what is one of the most accessible ways to improve our wellbeing by connecting with our loved ones. And the first thing that came up for me was smile / laughter.

Smile and laugher gives us power over our emotions. Laughter can reframe our day helping us by developing a safe emotional bond with our loved ones.  Through smile and laughter we don’t only bring ourselves to a level of joy and happiness but we also share and spread these positive feelings towards others.

Have you noticed how babies have a genuine tendency to laugh / smile when they look at their trusted adults? Laughter is the most direct line of contact between two people. Through laughter you connect to others and this connection brings you joy.  

When you struggle throughout the day think of your baby’s smile and laughter and notice what it is happening for you at emotional level. You might start smiling as well. This is to reinforce the fact that laughter brings up joy, and despite of being such a simple and genuine act it is got such a powerful impact on our wellbeing. There is no simpler way of human connection.  

Think of your baby’s laughter and of all the joy that laughter brings into your life. If we could bottle that up we would have a great antidote for all the times when things are not exactly the way we have planned them to be.  

Research has shown that the simple act of smiling for as little as 20 seconds can trigger positive emotions improving your wellbeing and allowing yourself to connect to your kindness. If you have a genuine kindness and love towards yourself then you can extend these towards your loved ones. 

Start from within … Smile to your little one and notice what happens. You can even create your own laughing / smiling game as a way to connect at emotional level. Start your day with a smile and share that smile with your loved ones. It is simple things that bring up joy and happiness within our families.  

By Cristina Butnaru, DorPIP Parent-Infant Psychotherapist